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Homemade Probiotic Raw Sauerkraut Salad

These probiotic raw sauerkraut salad recipes are easy to make at home. Fermented foods are fantastic dietary sources of living beneficial bacteria strains that help to maintain a healthy gut and ease many digestive issues.

Starter Tip: When new to consuming fermented foods, start slow with one teaspoon of sauerkraut per meal as to not overwhelm your gastrointestinal tract. Gradually increase as tolerated by your body up to around a quarter to a half-cup of fermented veggies at one or two meals a day.

danielakende.com

Recipe by Daniela Kende
Serves - 1 Jar
Prep. Time - 10
Cooking Time -
GF DF V Vg

Ingredients

When making your own raw sauerkraut, feel free to keep it classic with just cabbage and sea salt, or have fun experimenting with one of my three following go-to recipes:

Classic Caraway

  • 1 medium/ large head of cabbage (about 2 lbs)
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt or Himalayan pink salt
  • ½ cup filtered or spring water
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds

Sassy Cilantro & Jalapeno

  • 1 medium/ large head of cabbage (about 2 lbs)
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt or Himalayan pink salt
  • ½ cup filtered or spring water
  • 1 jalapeno (or more if you love spice)
  • Large handful cilantro, roughly chopped

Ginger & Carrot Zing

  • 1 medium/ large head of cabbage (about 2 lbs)
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt or Himalayan pink salt
  • ½ cup filtered or spring water
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 small carrots, grated

Method

Ten Steps to Making Your Own Sauerkraut

  • Wash everything very well in very hot water. A large mixing bowl, glass jar, mixing utensils (or hands!), sharp knife or food processor, and all of your veggies
  • Carefully peel off the 3 outermost leaves of cabbage and set aside
  • Chop, thinly slice or shred your cabbage by hand or in a food processor and place in a large mixing bowl
  • Chop or shred any other ingredients you are using into the same bowl and add your sea salt. Massage thoroughly to release the cabbage’s natural liquid, then add ½ cup water, fresh cold-pressed celery juice, or veggie puree. (if using celery juice, very little to no salt is needed)
  • Pack kraut mix into your glass jar, using your fist or a masher/ wooden spoon to press layers down and push out air and liquid. The brine should be above the kraut fill, and you should leave about a 1-inch of room at the top of your jar
  • Protect your kraut from air exposure by covering the top layer with one of your large cabbage leaves you set aside at the start. Then on top of that add a few rolled up smaller leaves OR weigh down with a glass shot glass or anything else weighted to keep kraut below the liquid. Fermenting veggies require an anaerobic (oxygen-free) environment to avoid yeast and mold, so keeping air away from your fermenting kraut is key for healthy results.
  • Cover your jar – but not too tight, in order to let CO2 escape
  • To the pantry you go! Store in a dark, dry, cool place on a paper towel in a baking dish or in a temperature-controlled cooler, as a little leakage might happen during the first few days as the kraut expands. This is normal. Try to keep your kraut in an environment between 65-72 degrees.
  • Let the wait begin. Give it about 7 days. If it’s summertime and warmer inside, kraut could be ready in about 3 days. You’ll see small bubbles forming as the kraut ferments.
  • Discard top cabbage leaves and enjoy!

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